Category Archives: Academic Works

CUNY Academic Works Monthly Report: May 2017

A snapshot of CUNY Academic Works

A snapshot of CUNY Academic Works

During the month of May, CUNY Academic Works grew by 238 new items and 48,708 new downloads!

The five most downloaded works in May include:

  1. Media Representation of Asian Americans and Asian Native New Yorkers’ Hybrid Persona
    Series: Dissertations and Theses at the CUNY Graduate Center
  2. Training a New Trick Using No-Reward markers: Effects on Dogs’ Performance and Stress Behaviors
    Series: Student Theses at Hunter College
  3. The Growth of Incarceration in the United States: Exploring Causes and Consequences
    Series: Publications and Research at John Jay College of Criminal Justice
  4. New York City Drunk Driving After Uber
    Series: Publications and Research at the CUNY Graduate Center
  5. Birthing, Blackness, and the Body: Black Midwives and Experiential Continuities of Institutional Racism
    Series: Dissertations and Theses at the CUNY Graduate Center

Please note that, with one exception, May’s top downloads were all authored by CUNY students! This is no surprise. Students’ unpublished dissertations and theses have a higher per item download count over any other type of content. As of this date, nine schools collect dissertations and theses in CUNY Academic Works: Baruch College, City College of New York, College of Staten Island, CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, CUNY School of Public Health, CUNY Graduate Center, Hunter College, John Jay College of Criminal Justice, and Queens College. Some of these schools started collections as part of a longstanding requirement (with an opt-out option), and others started their collections because a student requested it. Watch this space for more information about students works in CUNY Academic Works. In the meantime, you may be interested in reading Roxanne Shirazi’s recent post on the GC Library’s blog, Dissertations and Theses Year-in-Review, 2016-17.

CUNY Academic Works Monthly Report: April 2017

A snapshot of CUNY Academic Works

A snapshot of CUNY Academic Works

During the month of April, CUNY Academic Works grew by 218 new items and 48,090 new downloads!

The five most downloaded works in April include:

  1. New York City Drunk Driving After Uber
    Series: Publications and Research at the CUNY Graduate Center
  2. The Influence of Anti-Semitism on United States Immigration Policy with Respect to German Jews During 1933-1939
    Series: Master’s Theses at City College of New York
  3. Media Representation of Asian Americans and Asian Native New Yorkers’ Hybrid Persona
    Series: Dissertations and Theses at the CUNY Graduate Center
  4. The Growth of Incarceration in the United States: Exploring Causes and Consequences
    Series: Publications and Research at John Jay College of Criminal Justice
  5. Reframing School Dropout as a Public Health Issue
    Series: Publications and Research at Hunter College

CUNY Academic Works in the News

When CUNY researchers share their work with a wider public, this includes journalists interested in fact-based reporting. Therefore, it should come as no surprise that April’s top two downloads have the additional distinction of being cited in the news!

A doctoral candidate in the Graduate Center’s Economics Program, Jessica Lynn Peck, found that NYC has seen a 25 to 35 percent decrease in alcohol-related crashes since 2011. Both the Miami Herald and The Economist cited her working paper, “New York City Drunk Driving After Uber,” bringing scores of new readers to it (including some from Uber and even the U.S. Department of Transportation!).

A 2011 master’s thesis from former City College student and current CUNY Graduate Center student Barbara L. Bailin examines the influence of anti-semitism on United States immigration policies and was recently cited by Ingrid Anderson (Boston University) in a piece for The Conversation. An independent (and open access!) source of news and perspectives from the academic and research community, the story was then picked up by other outlets such as Salon, Alternet, Business Insider, and Observer. These are wonderful examples of how publicly accessible research can be translated into publicly accessible language.

CUNY Academic Works Monthly Report: March 2017

A snapshot of CUNY Academic Works

A snapshot of CUNY Academic Works

During the month of March, CUNY Academic Works grew by 164 new items, received 48,355 new downloads, and reached a new milestone! Almost two years since the soft launch of CUNY Academic Works in March 2015, content was downloaded over 500,000 times. This number only continues to grow as CUNY-generated white papers, peer-reviewed journal articles, and student theses are downloaded from all over the world.

The five most downloaded works in March include:

  1. Media Representation of Asian Americans and Asian Native New Yorkers’ Hybrid Persona
    Series: Theses and Dissertations at the CUNY Graduate Center
  2. The Growth of Incarceration in the United States: Exploring Causes and Consequences
    Series: Publications and Research at John Jay College
  3. Reframing School Dropout as a Public Health Issue
    Series: Publications and Research at Hunter College
  4. An Analysis of the South China Sea Dispute: Focusing on the Assessment of the Impact of Possible Solutions on the Economies of the Region
    Series: Master’s Theses at City College of New York
  5. Psychosis in Films: An Analysis of Stigma and the Portrayal in Feature Films
    Series: Master’s Theses at City College of New York
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CUNY Academic Works Reaches 500,000 Downloads

CelebrationAlmost two short years since its launch, content in CUNY Academic Works has been downloaded over 500,000 times! These downloads come from every state and every country and represent the local and global impact of making CUNY’s research, scholarship, and creative works publicly accessible to all. As the repository continues to grow, we only expect to see the download rate rise. Stay tuned!

 

CUNY Academic Works Monthly Report: November 2016

A snapshot of CUNY Academic Works

A snapshot of CUNY Academic Works

CUNY Academic Works continued its steady progress, growing by 159 new items and 30,244 new downloads during the month of November. However, this month saw a significant change in the tone of the open access movement as a result of the presidential election. Following Brewster Kahle’s impassioned keynote at OpenCon, the Internet Archive announced it will create a copy of its collections in Canada, and, more recently, that it will replicate 200TB of at-risk data from National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The actions of the Internet Archive reflect the research community’s shared concern about open access under the new administration: Will the public access mandates be rescinded? Will infrastructure such as PubMed continue to be supported? How will the administration respond to publisher lobbyists? We don’t know what will come next but the Office of Library Services will continue to support the free and open sharing of research and teaching materials via CUNY Academic Works.

The five most downloaded works in November were:

  1. The Growth of Incarceration in the United States: Exploring Causes and Consequences
    Publications and Research at John Jay College
  2. Reframing School Dropout as a Public Health Issue
    Publications and Research at Hunter College
  3. Media Representation of Asian Americans and Asian Native New Yorkers’ Hybrid Persona
    Dissertations and Theses at CUNY Graduate Center
  4. Psychosis in Films: An Analysis of Stigma and the Portrayal in Feature Films
    Theses at City College of New York
  5. An Analysis of the South China Sea Dispute: Focusing on the Assessment of the Impact of Possible Solutions on the Economies of the Region
    Theses at City College of New York
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