Category Archives: Academic Works

CUNY Academic Works Monthly Report: March 2017

A snapshot of CUNY Academic Works

A snapshot of CUNY Academic Works

During the month of March, CUNY Academic Works grew by 164 new items, received 48,355 new downloads, and reached a new milestone! Almost two years since the soft launch of CUNY Academic Works in March 2015, content was downloaded over 500,000 times. This number only continues to grow as CUNY-generated white papers, peer-reviewed journal articles, and student theses are downloaded from all over the world.

The five most downloaded works in March include:

  1. Media Representation of Asian Americans and Asian Native New Yorkers’ Hybrid Persona
    Series: Theses and Dissertations at the CUNY Graduate Center
  2. The Growth of Incarceration in the United States: Exploring Causes and Consequences
    Series: Publications and Research at John Jay College
  3. Reframing School Dropout as a Public Health Issue
    Series: Publications and Research at Hunter College
  4. An Analysis of the South China Sea Dispute: Focusing on the Assessment of the Impact of Possible Solutions on the Economies of the Region
    Series: Master’s Theses at City College of New York
  5. Psychosis in Films: An Analysis of Stigma and the Portrayal in Feature Films
    Series: Master’s Theses at City College of New York
Tagged ,

CUNY Academic Works Reaches 500,000 Downloads

CelebrationAlmost two short years since its launch, content in CUNY Academic Works has been downloaded over 500,000 times! These downloads come from every state and every country and represent the local and global impact of making CUNY’s research, scholarship, and creative works publicly accessible to all. As the repository continues to grow, we only expect to see the download rate rise. Stay tuned!

 

CUNY Academic Works Monthly Report: November 2016

A snapshot of CUNY Academic Works

A snapshot of CUNY Academic Works

CUNY Academic Works continued its steady progress, growing by 159 new items and 30,244 new downloads during the month of November. However, this month saw a significant change in the tone of the open access movement as a result of the presidential election. Following Brewster Kahle’s impassioned keynote at OpenCon, the Internet Archive announced it will create a copy of its collections in Canada, and, more recently, that it will replicate 200TB of at-risk data from National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The actions of the Internet Archive reflect the research community’s shared concern about open access under the new administration: Will the public access mandates be rescinded? Will infrastructure such as PubMed continue to be supported? How will the administration respond to publisher lobbyists? We don’t know what will come next but the Office of Library Services will continue to support the free and open sharing of research and teaching materials via CUNY Academic Works.

The five most downloaded works in November were:

  1. The Growth of Incarceration in the United States: Exploring Causes and Consequences
    Publications and Research at John Jay College
  2. Reframing School Dropout as a Public Health Issue
    Publications and Research at Hunter College
  3. Media Representation of Asian Americans and Asian Native New Yorkers’ Hybrid Persona
    Dissertations and Theses at CUNY Graduate Center
  4. Psychosis in Films: An Analysis of Stigma and the Portrayal in Feature Films
    Theses at City College of New York
  5. An Analysis of the South China Sea Dispute: Focusing on the Assessment of the Impact of Possible Solutions on the Economies of the Region
    Theses at City College of New York

CUNY Academic Works Monthly Report: October 2016

A snapshot of CUNY Academic Works

A snapshot of CUNY Academic Works

Each October, researchers and librarians across the globe celebrate Open Access Week, an international event encouraging and celebrating open practices in research and scholarship. Here at CUNY, we have so much to celebrate that Open Access Week lasts all month long. This year was no exception. CUNY Librarians put open in action, organizing workshops and events, tabling on their campuses, and initiating one-on-one conversations with faculty colleagues to let them know about CUNY Academic Works. As a result, there’s been an increase in faculty self-submissions, indicating a deeper and growing engagement with the repository. CUNY Academic Works grew by 111 new items, and received 36,976 new downloads (56% of which were international).

This month also saw an unprecedented download spike when Academic Works went from an average of 1,000 downloads per day to 5,309 downloads on October 11th and 3,110 downloads on October 12th. After investigating this anomaly, the Office of Library Services reached out to the technical team at bepress who confirmed these downloads were from individual users, not bots. If you’d like to learn more about the process for identifying and removing bots from CUNY Academic Works usage statistics, you may be interested in the recent bepress webinar, Bot Shields: Activate! Ensuring Reliable Repository Download Statistics. (Trust me – it’s well worth your time.)

The five most downloaded works in October include:

  1. Improving Exploration And Exploitation Capability Of Harmony Search Algorithm
    Series: Publications and Research at City College of New York
  2. The Growth of Incarceration in the United States: Exploring Causes and Consequences
    Series: Publications and Research at John Jay College
  3. Reframing School Dropout as a Public Health Issue
    Series: Master’s Theses at Hunter College
  4. Folk Concepts
    Series: Publications and Research at Kingsborough Community College
  5. An Analysis of the South China Sea Dispute: Focusing on the Assessment of the Impact of Possible Solutions on the Economies of the Region
    Series: Master’s Theses at City College of New York

The fourth most downloaded item, Folk Concepts, comes from Professor Jay Bernstein at Kingsborough Community College who passed away this summer. Jay was a fierce advocate for CUNY Academic Works and one of my closest colleagues and collaborators in this initiative. His absence is deeply felt—so I was very heartened to see Folk Concepts, originally published as a chapter in the $430 reference work 21st Century Anthropology: A Reference Handbook, receive so much attention this month. A large portion of these downloads come from Kenyatta University in Nairobi City, Kenya. It’s fun to imagine how this work is being used. I know Jay would’ve enjoyed this as well.

CUNY Academic Works in bepress Archive

The Office of Library Services is pleased to announce that CUNY Academic Works now offers increased preservation via a new service, bepress Archive.

Content on bepress platforms has always been protected by an infrastructure that includes multiple backups as well as long-term storage with Amazon Glacier. These services will continue, but by adding Amazon S3 (Simple Storage Solution) via bepress Archive, the Office of Library Services will no longer receive quarterly archives of content to store on local servers. Instead, we have a real-time archive of all content on an industry standard-platform that provides 99.9999999999% file durability, performs checksums for data integrity, and uses redundant data to repair any corrupted files. These additional features are especially important as researchers across CUNY look to submit their research products—including their data—to CUNY Academic Works in order to comply with mandates from federal and private funding agencies.

For more information, please see the blog post on the DC Telegraph or contact the Office of Library Services. You may also be interested in Amazon’s video promoting its service:

Tagged , , , , ,
css.php
Need help with the Commons? Visit our
help page
Send us a message
Skip to toolbar